Whispers of a Drunken Architect

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Kagus Keel

Think you’re clever, eh Blizzard?

Who is Kagus Deel?

Folks who have played the third act of Diablo 3 may have heard rumors, whispers of his existence.

It is said his spirit roams the depths of Bastion, drinking in death as he did in life.

Do I smell a rare encounter? Or perhaps a DLC?

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Oh Snap, Music! Todd Terje

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I’ll be quick and straight to the point on this one – check out Todd Terje if you like dance/house/electronic music.

I can’t claim that I knew of this Norwegian DJ since back on the day or that I have his original eight-track tape deck/vinyl white label.  In fact, I heard his song “Inspector Norse” at a Uniqlo.  I suppose a hipster critic would deem this pretty much the most “un-cool” way to discover an artist, but that fits with my generally un-cool nature.

Upbeat, quirky, and very very slightly reminiscent of disco, “Inspector Norse” combines the right amount of repetitive catchy melody with subtly changing background rhythms.  The end result is a peppy track that’s great for driving, running, dancing and other such activities.

 

If you dig the style, follow up with “Ragysh”, a longer, slower building track that comes off as less eletrco-disco and more serious.

“If you come at the king, you best not miss.”

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There has been much talk of comparing the new HBO series “A Game of Thrones” to another classic series, “The Wire”.

The comparison certainly holds a bit of truth in that “A Game of Thrones”, like the books it is based on, focuses much time on politics, intrigue, and relationships between characters.

I’ve been re-reading the original George R.R. Martin books as I watch the episodes of the new TV series, and can’t help making the comparison myself.

Especially when Cersei Lannister, the devious queen, says something like,

When you play the game of thrones, you win or you die. There is no middle ground.

I’ve been enjoying the show so far but am somewhat unsure of how I feel about the story changes made for the series.  When you are trying to adapt hundreds of pages of multiple interwoven storylines for the TV screen, you have to make some tough decisions about what to keep and what to cut.  There is an overarching need to tell the story in the most efficient way possible, while taking advantage of the screen to show the action directly.  However, there are some changes in the series that don’t seem to be driven by that need for efficiency.

I’ll save you the fanboy rant and just illuminate one of the key changes I noticed.

*** WARNING: SPOILERS FOR THE SERIES AND THE BOOKS BELOW ***

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